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24.4.19

PODCAST 356: Easter Bunny, Kill! Kill! & Night of the Lepus [Killer Bunny Easter Edition]


This week the Horror Duo chat about killer rabbits in celebration of the Easter holiday. Forest takes in Easter Bunny, Kill! Kill! a throwback to '70s exploitation and Cory finally watches the lack luster animal attack flick, Night of the Lepus.

Cory shares stories from meeting Sting and Hacksaw Jim Duggan, and Forest sees the newest Hellboy movie and is disappointed. All this and Cory retools the Hunchback of Notre Dame as a pedo.

"EASTER BUNNY, KILL! KILL!"

★ ★

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"NIGHT OF THE LEPUS"

★ ★

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TIME CODE

  • 00:00 - Introduction & News
  • 21:34 - "Easter Bunny, Kill! Kill!"
  • 34:46 - Know Your Horror Trivia
  • 36:06 - "Night of the Lepus"
  • 1:00:47 - Comments & Conclusion

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1 comments:

Blake said...

About Japanese exploitation films in the 70s, here's a little background. By the mid-60s, TV was killing the Japanese film industry. Imagine tuning into Ultraman or Ultra 7 to get your kaiju fix, instead of paying money to see Godzilla and Gamera on the big screen. The phenomenon was widespread throughout the entire movie industry: all genres from all studios felt the blow. So by the 70s, studios started making films that would offer something that you couldn't see on TV. For Nikkatsu, it was the pinku/Roman Porno ("Roman" meaning "romantic") genre. For Toho, it was the Lone Wolf and Cub and similar samurai films that had the geysers of blood, with some nudity and rape thrown in. For Toei, it was Sonny Chiba and his violent, sleazy karate movies, which also mixed ultraviolence with nudity (and some rape). It was what the studios could do to stay in business at the time.

Also, Cory mentioned that NIGHT OF THE LEPUS came out a little too late to be a Bert I. Gordon film. Not quite. Mr. BIG directed two giant animal movies during the 70s, both of them being "adaptations" of H.G. Wells novels: FOOD OF THE GODS and EMPIRE OF THE ANTS. Both films used his favorite trick of photographically enlarging regular animals.